The Sail Transport Network connects people – locally and across oceans – who are building community resilience by reviving heirloom technologies that will enable them to thrive in a fossil fuel-depleted, climate-disrupted world. We are the people – traders and sailors, farmers and craftsmen, artists and merchants – who will continue to tie your world together even as fossil fuel-based transportation recedes into the smoggy past.

Things to Know as Collapse Becomes Hip


Note: this op-ed was featured on Truthout.org on Aug. 24, 2013.

A consensus seems to be building toward anticipating collapse. So what's your flavor? Financial meltdown with chaos? Petrocollapse? Climate extinction? The contributing crises are seemingly diverse, including Fukushima's mounting radioactive releases into the Pacific, the growing plastic plague and creeping GMO contamination. If none of those are your thing, you can acknowledge accelerating bee colony collapse.

European Union's SAIL consortium: bringing on the future


The nations and waters of the North Sea comprise the modern world's most intensive sail transport environment. For those readers and sailors who have cheered on the Tres Hombres schooner-brig, and noted the creation of numerous sail transport projects here and there, the big eye-opener in terms of united international resolve can now be revealed: The European Union's SAIL project, part of the North Sea Region Program whose theme is "Investing in the future." SAIL's mission is to bring about the construction and operation of the first Wind Assisted Ship Propulsion (WASP) large cargo ship.

Time Magazine Video on Sail Transport Trends: Getting on the Bandwagon


The Aug. 7 video by Time Magazine's Bryan Walsh is the best one I've seen on global sail transport trends. As it is only a bit over 5 minutes, you can get brought up to speed and sense the excitement that is spreading. Time's coverage centers on Fair Transport's Tres Hombres schooner-brig and the group's plans for a four masted ecoliner to be four times as long as the 32-meter Tres Hombres.

Global Warming: a definitive pain(t)ing

This state of affairs can't last.
This state of affairs can't last.

"Art is the Permanent Revolution" - memo to Culture Change

Jan Lundberg, founder of Culture Change and Sail Transport Network, said "Fernando Agudelo is a concept artist, designer, and creative illustrator living in Hollywood, Florida. He proves that a piece of art such as the right picture paints a thousand words, and it does even more. In offering his new painting Global Warming, out of the blue, to be shared on CultureChange.org and SailTransportNetwork.org, he explained:

Rolls-Royce Revives Age of Sail to Beat Fuel-Cost


This major news article got the attention of folks in the sail transport movement:
Rolls-Royce Revives Age of Sail to Beat Fuel-Cost Surge: Freight, by Bloomberg's Robert Wall - July 10, 2013

It is a boost to our movement when it is seen that some of the vast "oil money" from the corporate global economy starts to be transfered to sustainability. This confirms what more and more people are aware of: sail transport is on the rise and cannot fail to fulfill the promise of ultra-efficient, clean energy for travel and trade.

Holland's Sail Transport Success Today

unloading sailed rum
unloading sailed rum


Voyage of the Tres Hombres, June 3-6 to Amsterdam

A sailboat can be part of nature, a living state that no motorboat can ever accomplish. This makes intellectual sense, but you feel it on the sea especially in a wooden boat under sail. The relationship between a human being and the sea is intimate and deep. It is also the basis of the current revival of sail transport.

Natural wines transported by sail power

More than 3,000 bottles of wine have been sailed into London by a new company keen to demonstrate the environmental benefits of old-fashioned wind power.

It looks like a relic from a bygone age, but the 20-metre wooden sailing boat anchored in London's St Katharine dock could be a sign of things to come, according to Guillaume Le Grand, founder of TransOceanic Wind Transport (TOWT).

Read more on Decanter.com

What's new in Square Boats

This article was originally published on ClubOrlov.com


Long-time readers of this blog probably know that there are such things in the world as square boats, and that they tend to do all that intricately modeled boats do, better and for a lot less money, plus they have a host of other advantages. But such knowledge is rare, even among sailors. I speak from experience, having recently spent a fair amount of time working on a square boat—my old Hogfish, which I have sold, and which is hauled out in a boatyard, being readied for her next tour of duty in the Caribbean and then, via the Canal, the Pacific. As I worked, various types of boaty/yachty people would come up to me and ask me questions. The typical question was “What is this thing?” usually followed by a comment, such as “It looks really unusual.”

Sail Transport for New York City Takes Shape


Interview with Andrew Willner of HARVEST - Harbor and River Vessel Transport Company

Editor's note: Andrew Willner is a key environmental activist for the New York City region, with a long track record in conservation and political alliances. Baykeeper and the Waterkeeper Alliance are prestigious groups he has helped lead that have been templates for other regions' progress.

How shipping containers shortened the life span of petro-civilization

Editor's introduction: This analysis deftly reveals how our cities physically and culturally changed to accommodate commerce, technology and economies of scale to the detriment of communities' livelihoods. Alice Friedemann spent many years in the shipping business (ships), and since retirement has ratcheted up her critique of the corporate economy's distribution system as she explores peak oil. Her previous articles have focused on "Peak Soil", and the "Financial Monsters" we face as economic reality catches up with endless growth.- Jan Lundberg

Book Review: Mark Levinson: The Box. How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger. Princeton University Press, 2006.

Mark Levinson has written a book that shows how containers made global trade possible. In the preface of the paperback edition, he notes other aspects of containerization he became aware of later, such as the potential for containers to harbor atomic weapons, how they’ve become homes, and so on.

To me, what Levinson leaves out is how this global distribution system will make it very difficult to go back to local production as energy declines. He doesn’t mention that containerization was the fastest way yet for capitalism to loot the planet and strip Mother Earth down to her hard dry skin.

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